Tone pot dating now consolidating results

Posted by / 03-Apr-2017 03:12

The largest value would likely be best used with the bridge pickup.I would also suggest that you review the thread from a little while back in the Tone Zone area titled "new insight into pots".As you may guess, the questions are pretty personal, so users can chose to keep their scores private or public. While many sites are far from forthright when it comes to the actual size of their community, Casual Kiss posts its stats right on the homepage.You can then use the results to screen members using the spam application, a saved search which that lets users hide from other members. As of election week, 2008 there were 129,501 active members.I suspect the way things work with those numbers seen on Gibson pots is that they are some kind of part number and instead of identifying a specific Kohm value, they may instead just simply indicate either the tone pot or volume pot of that day, that era.There was a time when they did use 300K volumes and 100K tones, 300Ks starting around July 1973 and later 100K tones.

First when you said "When on 10, a pot usually seems to measure around 1K to 3K ohms.", that does not exactly make any sense.

In having looked at various Gibson pots, here's what I noticed in terms of part numbers and values: 44071079 - long shaft "tone" pot, 100K audio in very late 70s through mid 1980s, 500K audio in 1990s up until today 44070034 - long shaft "volume" pot, 300K linear 44070028 - short shaft "volume" pot, 300K linear 44070035 - short shaft "tone" pot, 500K audio 44070500 - short shaft pots, 500K, used in recent Historics, the pots with the scary plastic insides I just ordered 6 CTS pots to upgrade my Y2K 59.

I ordered 6 because I of the variances in resistance.

A 600K pot with a 1Meg parallel resistor would produce a net 375K.

I put a 1Meg audio pot in my R9 for the bridge volume pot, intended for using higher output pups, but I later added something like a 1.5 Meg resistor in parallel to get a lower net value around 600K when I switched to trying a more traditional pup such as an Antiquity. Could you explain why a guitar sounds brighter with no tone pot versus the same guitar with a tone pot set on 10? Also, if you have two guitars setup exactly the same except one guitar has a 500K tone pot and the other has say a 250K tone pot (or whatever), would there be a difference in sound if the tone controls were set on 10 on both guitars? Also, does the resistor mod you mentioned above mess with the taper of the pot any? if you have two pots that both measure 500K, and one is a normal pot and the other is a pot with the "resistor" mod, would they both put out an equal amount of resistance at a setting of say 5 for example?

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Since I can only use 4 (and I'm assuming that I use the top 4 in the list), is there an optimum position for the pots?